• 2012-2013 Season,  Henry 5

    A Special Orem Public Library Performance of HENRY 5–FREE!

    by Anne Flinders, dramaturg BYU’s Young Company cast and crew is bringing a free performance of Henry 5 to the Orem Public Library (58 N State St, Orem). This special performance is a tradition that Young Company has shared with the library for several years, bringing excellent children’s theatre to the Orem community. The performance will be on Monday, April 15th at 7:00 pm in the storytelling wing of the library; the performance lasts about 50 minutes. It is open to the public and free of charge. The company will present the same production they have taken on the road over the past semester as part of their tour to elementary…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Gone Missing/Cleverest Thief

    Reflections

    by Ariel Mitchell, dramaturg Theater is a live art. You share an experience physically together in a space with actors, crew, and fellow audience members. Things happen differently as actors attempt to repeat actions and new audiences with diverse experiences come in and receive new things, laugh in different places, and clap (or don’t) where no one has before. That’s what is exciting about theater. You can see the same play performed by the same company over and over, but still you can experience something new. However, the problem with live art is there always comes a time when it has to die. The curtain falls on the performance and…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Gone Missing/Cleverest Thief

    Design and Dramaturgy

    by Ariel Mitchell, dramaturg This past week, our Gone Missing production team has broken into groups: Design and Dramaturgy. The designers will focus on how the show will look, how many screens we need, how we will use lighting, costumes, and projections to tell the stories of loss outlined in Gone Missing and The Cleverest Thief. Meanwhile the dramaturgy group will be workshopping the moments we have chosen into a text that the actors can memorize and use. Basically what this means is that the four main writers will each take one moment we have chosen home. They will treat it as it’s own play thinking of traditional plot structure (inciting incident, rising…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Holiday

    Transitions from Rehearsal to Stage

    by Bianca Dillard, dramaturg Our rehearsal process for Holiday has officially come to a close–last night was our last dress rehearsal and tonight will be our first preview. Now comes the part where we step out of the vacuum of rehearsal and on to the stage of performance where the interaction with the audience become real, and live, and tangible. I would like to share a few last behind the scene photos to celebrate our rehearsal process and share a few production photos to whet your appetite for the performance itself.   In the coming days please stay tuned as I will be posting some material that will supplement the information provided in the Study Guide.…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Sleepy Hollow

    On the Trail with Sleepy Hollow

    by Janine Sobeck, BYU Dramaturgy Specialist Every semester the TYA production tours to schools in Utah, Salt Lake and Nebo counties.  The BYU students dedicate their Tuesdays and Thursdays to the show in order  to travel to the various schools, performing and offering different workshops. In the middle of the semester, they add to their crazy touring schedule with a two week run on the BYU campus.  Traveling around Utah by day and in the BYU theatre at night, this is a time where the lives of the actors seem to be consumed by the show in an incredible and amazing way.  This period of immersion also gives a great…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Gone Missing/Cleverest Thief

    Horizontal Theater

    by Ariel Mitchell, dramaturg One of the most well known theatrical companies to use the devising method is the Tectonic Theater Project headed by Moisés Kaufman. Some of their most well known works include 33 Variations, Gross Indecency, and The Laramie Project. In each of these cases, the company implements the technique of horizontal theater. The traditional setup of theater is vertical. You begin with a text. Then you add set, costumes, lights, a director’s concept, and actors. You build upwards always referencing the foundation (i.e. the text) off of which every decision is based. Horizontal theater on the other hand treats every aspect of theater as equally important. Instead…