• 2012-2013 Season,  Gone Missing/Cleverest Thief

    An Actor’s Perspective

    by Ali Kinkade, actor and performance writer When you play around ten characters in a show, it presents a unique acting challenge. In Gone Missing and The Cleverest Thief, I play an old Russian woman, a hip social worker with a checkered past, and a BYU student with an affinity for both makeup and histrionics, among other characters. Another unique aspect of this show is that oftentimes, since interviews form the text of our show, we interacted with the people we were playing, so instead of working internally, I worked from the outside in. That sounds confusing, so here’s an example: when Michelle Williams played Marilyn Monroe in My Week…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Henry 5

    “O, for a muse of fire!” Henry 5 Act I, Prologue

    by Anne Flinders, dramaturg The Young Company opened its production of Henry 5 last week, both on tour and in the Nelke Theatre. Preparing for this play required each cast member to explore and develop characters that are diverse in age, gender, and experience. We asked the cast what has been a source of inspiration for them in preparing for their roles in Henry 5? Is there something particular that encapsulates a source of inspiration for the performances you give in the play? In other words: What or who is your “muse”? Sarah Flinders plays the Boy, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the King of France. To find inspiration in…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Gone Missing/Cleverest Thief

    Creating a Character

    by Ariel Mitchell, dramaturg One of the hardest things for any actor is creating a character. The actor has to be able to separate themselves and their mannerisms from the mannerisms of the person they are trying to portray. This is especially hard when trying to depict a real person that you have met and interviewed. In order to differentiate yourself from a character the easiest thing to do is to heighten their ticks (fiddling with a necklace, drumming fingers, running a hand through their hair, etc.) and try to match their vocal tone and posture. Unfortunately, heightening these aspects of a person often come off as comical. Whenever is…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Phantom of the Opera

    The Phantom’s Paris: Life in the Belle Epoque

    by Nicholas Sheets, dramaturg Awhile back I created a presentation for the actors as their dramaturg. I had been given an assignment by the director and co-director to help the actors delve into their roles in this production. For example, the actor playing Raoul needs to learn what sort of life he would live during the 1880’s in France to help create his back-story. The back-story is the world in which the actor will put himself so everything he does has history during the performance. For example, when Raoul says certain things in Phantom he understands why he is speaking that particular way and what kind of relationships he has with the…

  • 2012-2013 Season,  Servant of Two Masters

    Meeting the Characters: The Fathers & The Lovers

    by Janine Sobeck, dramaturg Now that you have met the servants, here’s a peek at the other two categories of characters that make up any classic commedia dell’arte play. The Fathers: The two most common father characters are Pantalone and Dottore (The Doctor). Pantalone, the Venetian merchant, is a old and miserly.  Usually the father of the female lover, he has one goal in life: to make as much money as possible.  In order to reach his goal, he often tries to marry his daughter off to the richest suitor available, even if she does not care for him.  He also believes himself to be quite the ladies man. Dottore…