• 2016-2017 Season,  Chariots of Fire

    An American Premiere

    By Shelley Graham, dramaturg There were have been several wonderful coincidences and years of hard work that made the American Premiere of Chariots of Fire a possibility at BYU. You may be familiar with the 1981 film that was the surprise Oscar winner for Best Picture. In fact most people, whether they have seen the film or not, can hum the famous opening theme by Vangelis Papathanassiou. Here is one artist’s take on the popularity of that opening number: Mr Bean and the Chariots of Fire Theme

  • 2016-2017 Season,  Chariots of Fire

    Social Class in the 1920s

    By Shelley Graham, Dramaturg Chariots of Fire takes place in Britain from roughly 1920 to 1924, a time period in which established social mores were changing rapidly. Throughout the play we see the various social classes represented. As Britain emerged from the ravages of World War I (or The Great War, as it was termed then,) there was a major rift in those social classes. Throughout the twenties, the working class would see poverty growing at an alarming rate, while the middle and upper classes fought for cultural prominence. Early in the play we see wealthy young men arriving for their first day of school at Cambridge University. They are…

  • 2016-2017 Season,  Chariots of Fire

    Birth of the Actor Athlete

    By Amelia Johnson, Assistant Dramaturg What did it take to be a cast member of this show? Time, hard work, and a lot of sweat. But, that is to be expected when your show is about Olympic runners. When you have a passion for something, you strive to be as good as you can at it. When your passion is acting, sometimes you learn new skills in order to play a part. Our actors embraced this and became actor athletes. In addition to learning their lines, blocking, and working to understand their characters, our actor athletes took part in training to get in the physical shape of a runner. They…

  • 2016-2017 Season,  Chariots of Fire

    Chariots of Fire – American Premiere

    By Shelley Graham, dramaturg June 24, 1924. The headline of the Los Angeles Times reads: “Did You Know That Famous Scotch Sprinter Will Not Run in the Olympic 100 Metres Because The Trials Are Run on Sunday.” The famous sprinter mentioned in the headline was none other than Eric Liddell, otherwise known as “The Flying Scotsman,” and his decision not to run in the Olympic trials for his strongest event in order to honor the Sabbath was a decision that was noticed around the world. The story of his commitment to spirituality, and his spirit of competition, is told in the 1981 film, Chariots of Fire. That film was adapted…