• 2019-2020 Season,  Wilder Night

    Abstract Theatre’s Ugly Cousin: The Theatre of Cruelty

     by Hannah Gunson-McComb, dramaturg It doesn’t matter who started the trend first, all visual art will follow suit. What the visual art world does, performing arts surely will, too! So when the art community decided to question all tradition and create wild, evocative pieces in the name of their movement, “Dada,” theatre created its own aesthetic: abstract theatre.  Dada emerged after World War 1, when the surviving soldiers coming home from the war were suffering from existential crises. The terrors they’d seen on the battlefield had convinced them that the pursuit of truth and beauty through art was foolish and impossible because if humankind was capable of the ugliness they’d…

  • 2019-2020 Season,  Wilder Night

    90 Years of History – Part II

    Ninety years of history, summed up, proved too much to fit into just one post. This is part two of our historical journey, picking up at the 1890’s. Enjoy!    1890’s  Hundreds of Indian men, women, and children—and only 29 soldiers—were slain during the last major battle between U.S. troops and Indians with the Battle of Wounded Knee in South Dakota. However, while these indigenous people were being killed off, in 1896, Ellis Island Immigration Station opened and within that first year, over 450,000 immigrants passed through.                Thanks to James Naismith, basketball—and all its rules—was officially created and played in Springfield, Massachusetts in…

  • 2019-2020 Season,  Wilder Night

    90 Years of History – Part I

    With The Long Christmas Dinner spanning a full 90 years—starting at the 1850s— and both Pullman Car Hiawatha and The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden generally occurring in the 1920’s and the 1930’s, extensive research went into each decade that couldn’t possibly all fit into the Study Guide for A Wilder Night. Hence a 4th Wall Post (or two) was born!   1850’s  The 1850s saw a lot of technological advancements and connections. The railroad network and the telegraph network helped the nation economically. Immigrants from Europe were spilling into the US. Mills that popped up throughout the North East, and with the railway expansion, food from Midwest farms…