• 2019-2020 Season,  Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Shakespearean Secrets, Part 4

    “What secret hath held you here” -Don Pedro, Much Ado About Nothing, Act I Scene i Shakespeare’s Folio, Copies, & Translations     “The story that is printed” -Leonata, Much Ado About Nothing, Act IV Scene i The First Folio Shakespeare died in 1616. In 1623, members of his theatre guild posthumously published thirty-six out of his forty-two total Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies in what is known as the First Folio. The style for our production’s Study Guide is based on the style of this antique book. Up until the First Folio was printed, only 18 of Shakespeare’s plays had been published. Prior to this, the plays were published individually…

  • 2019-2020 Season,  Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Shakespearean Secrets, Part 3

    Shakespeare’s Songs, Music, & Dancing “Strike up Pipers!” -Benedick, Much Ado About Nothing, Act V Scene iv Songs in Shakespeare’s Scripts Unlike some of Shakespeare’s previously written scripts, Much Ado About Nothing contains a noteworthy number of additional stage directions requesting music. For our production, we called on BYU Alumni and faculty member, Dr. Sharon J. Harris, as a music consultant. Dr. Harris is a music researcher specializing in early modern English literature. Her research helped direct us to accurate time period music. As an added bonus, she also pointed out songs that are no longer recognized as such, yet were popular enough in Shakespeare’s day that he interjected their…

  • 2019-2020 Season,  Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Shakespearean Secrets, Part 2

    Shakespeare’s Words, Insults, & Sonnets by Pollyanna Eyler “I have studied eight or nine wise words to speak to you,” -Benedick, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III Scene ii   The Long and Short of Iambic Pentameter Shakespeare wrote both prose (natural dialogue) and verse (metered dialogue that rhymes) in Much Ado About Nothing and in his other scripts. Shakespeare tended to reserve verse for characters who were of a higher social status, although these characters may also slip back into prose. A standard line of verse in iambic pentameter structure contains ten syllables. Why do some lines of verse have more or less than ten syllables? One academic theory…

  • 2019-2020 Season,  Much Ado About Nothing

    Much Ado About Shakespearean Secrets, Part 1

    Shakespearean Dramaturgy, Sets, Assassination, & Theatre by Pollyanna Eyler, dramaturg   “In every lineament, branch, shape, and form” -Leonata, Much Ado About Nothing, Act V Scene i   Come See the New Shape of Things at BYU’s Pardoe Theatre When it comes to Shakespearean theatre, if you want to be “in the know” it may depend on “who” you know.  For Shakespeare and other plays, it may help to know a dramaturg. Beyond the power of a google search engine, dramaturgs make it a habit to not only find great pieces of information, but they also keep in mind a variety of resources beyond the internet. In this and the…